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A scholar of ancient archaeology and mythology believes that a massive mega-flood hit the South West of the UK some 14,700 years ago, and it would have wiped out 75 per cent of the local inhabitants!

In his latest book, Atlantis and the Biblical Flood: The Evidence at Last? Philip Runggaldier suggests that near the end of the last Ice Age, a great deluge hit as a giant glacial lake formed within the Irish Sea Basin.

Mr Runggaldier claims this flood would have engulfed most of Cornwall, and wiped out emerging civilisations in Devon, Wales and the south of Ireland.

This period of time was known as Llyn Lion - meaning Lake of Flood in Welsh. According to Mr Runggaldier, this was the worst natural disaster that Britain has ever experienced, and also explains the Formby Footprints.

In his book, he says "New evidence shows that a huge glacial lake formed within the Irish Sea Basin towards the end of the last Ice Age.

"The lake burst southwards 14,700 years ago, to rapidly drain the area, perhaps prompting local Stone Age inhabitants to venture onto the exposed muddy lakebed to see where all the water had gone or to collect stranded fish."

He then claims that the sun baked these footprints, and that explains the Formby footprints, which is the first time a theory has been put forward about how these were formed. Runggaldier also argues that this bursting lake engulfed the dry land which stretch from Ireland to Cornwall, known as the Celtic Plain.

Whether Runggaldier is correct in his theory or not may never be known, but it certainly adds to the historical charm that areas all across Cornwall hold.

If you would like to come and learn more about Kernow for yourself, why not book yourself into a room in our boutique hotel? Cornwall is waiting for you to discover her secrets!

 

Photo courtesy of Stephen Hudson, under Creative Commons.

Tagged under: Cornwall   Nature   News   History