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the chough has made a comeback to Cornwall

The Cornish chough features on Cornwall's coat of arms, and sadly disappeared from the Duchy in the 1970s. However, in the last 15 years it has slowly been making a comeback, with the number of breeding pairs reaching double figures.



Around 100 volunteers will be keeping watch on the nests of 12 potential breeding pairs this spring, as the chough makes a slow recovery to reclaim its Cornish territory. When the chough returned 15 years ago, DNA tests were done that determined the birds had arrived from Ireland.

One of the volunteers, Alix Lord, who first saw them return in 2001, said: "I was just so excited, we kept an eye on them and amazingly they settled. I would not expect now to walk the cliff and not hear a chough."

Claire Mucklow, who manages the RSPB's chough work, said: "It only seems like yesterday we were wondering if those first choughs would stay and if so would they breed, it makes me very proud to have been part of their amazing story over the last 15 years and see how the support for the chough has grown."

When staying at our boutique Fowey hotel, we recommend trying to see the native Cornish choughs, who nest along the north, south and west coasts. The watch point at the Lizard point, run by the National Trust is one of the best places for seeing the bird and learning more about them.

Other posts you may like:

Poldark actor makes an appearance at the Fowey Festival

Enjoy a summer break in Cornwall at The Cormorant Hotel

Photo by: Bob Jones

Tagged under: Fowey   Cornwall   wildlife   News