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See the giant redwoods planted at the Eden Project when staying at our boutique hotel

Cornwall will become the home to the tallest living things on Earth, as a forest of 40 giant Redwoods are to planted at the Eden Project. You can enjoy a visit when staying at our boutique hotel.



The redwood trees (Sequoia sempervirens) could live for 4,000 years, reach up to 400ft in height and will be the first redwoods grown in Europe. As they grow they will form an avenue along the road to the main entrance of the Eden Project. The planting marks the 15th anniversary of Eden's opening, which fell on March 17.

The first sapling planted was a clone from the Fieldbrook Stump, which is the remain of a northern Californian redwood felled in 1890 when it was around 3,500 years old. The planting was done by local students, apprentices working at the Eden Project and Eden's founder Sir Tim Smit.

Sir Tim Smit said, "It's very humbling to be planting these coast redwoods in their early years in the knowledge that they will probably still be here in 4,000 years' time. This is about the future of Eden and getting your people to embrace horticulture."

The Fieldbrook Stump was 35ft in diameter when it was cut down, wider than any other known trunk. Redwoods grow naturally in California and Oregon in the USA, so should be at home in Cornwall's damp and mild climate.

Other posts you may like:

The history behind the Sawmills Studios

Video shows dolphin feeding off the coast of Cornwall

Photo by: Public Domain Pictures

Tagged under: The Cormorant Hotel   Nature   News   Tourism