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Scientists near our hotel in Fowey, Cornwall discover birds shout to be heard over noise

Scientists based in Cornwall have discovered some new information about the habits of birds, and how they "shout" to ensure they are heard over man-made noise such as traffic.

They have claimed that bluebirds change their songs as a response to an increase in background noise, which is more often than not caused by human activities.

The study also found that the birds immediately change their song in response to increases in noise levels meaning they make what is known as "real-time" adjustments. Their songs will then be a lot louder, and at a much lower pitch than before.

These results suggest that birds are able to perceive the increases in noise, and respond accordingly; much like humans do in similar situations.

The study was led by a behavioural ecologist, Dr Caitlin Kight, who studies at the University of Exeter's Campus in Cornwall. She has said that the research could well aid in the understanding of the limits animal's communicating may experience, and how modifications made by humans can impact animals. This is being done with the aim of reducing any negative effects the disturbances may have on wildlife.

Luckily when you are staying at our hotel in Fowey, Cornwall's avian species won't have to shout to be heard, thanks to the tranquil surroundings we are set in. Why not take a look and book your room today?

Tagged under: Fowey   Cornwall   Cornwall   Nature   Nature   Science